Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Bypass/Lapband Study And Reality

For real.

Have you read the news today pertaining to gastric bypass vs. lapband?

If not, here is a link: Blah.

Apparently, in 2 separate studies, Gastric Bypass has proven itself to better a "better choice" for diabetes and for rapid weight loss.

Now, I will not pretend to argue either of those points. You do lose weight quicker with gastric bypass.

But the study sites the weight loss comparison after a year post-op. They neglect to say that after 2 years post-op the weight loss amount is practically the same. They also fail to mention that lapband is more reversible procedure.

They say that for the morbidly obese, gastic bypass is a better choice. I say I got your morbidly obese okay? I was off most BMI charts.

Recognize.

It just gets me fired up. There are factors that may help someone make a decision either way. I just hate to think that these "findings" would be the deciding factor for those that can succeed with the band.

17 comments:

  1. Hmm, I read the article and I don't feel they neglected to mention the comparable results after 2-3 years.

    They say, "Although more weight loss was seen for the gastric bypass group in the one-year study, patients getting the Lap-Band continue to lose weight for two to three years after the procedure, Khalili said.

    Comparing the two patient populations three years after surgery would probably have narrowed the weight-loss gap considerably, Khalili said."

    I could see how you would be upset though, because the majority of the article does seem to give an edge to gastric bypass, and doesn't mention the comparable weight loss results till the end. Perhaps a Letter to the Editor is called for? ;)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I agree, this crap gets me fired up, too. What is almost always never mentioned is that bypass patients tend to regain and the ability to keep the weight off is higher with the band. Between the reversible component and greater long term success, there is a slant to these articles that pisses me off. This was on our news the other night, too, and I was about yelling at the tv.

    No matter what, if people want to pursue WLS, they need to do their own research and break down the statistics for themselves. Propaganda is just that...

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is crap. I am close with people that have had both procedures and really!? Seeing a loved one still struggle after 10 years of bypass is really hard. This study is completely guiding people the wrong way and filling their heads with wrong info. BOO!
    BTW I love your blog! :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Funnily enough they do not mention the pain factor. The Bypass has a longer recovery rate and a more painful recovery.

    For me personally, I wouldn't be comfortable cutting up and restitching my insides... oh it gives me the shivers just thinking about it.

    They also fail to mention the weight gain statistics after 5 years....

    ReplyDelete
  5. What gets me fired up are the mean comments that people left on the article...about "fat people", etc. :(

    ReplyDelete
  6. The comments bother me way more than the article. Obesity is actually recognized by the medical profession as a disease, most of these comments actually prove how much the average Joe is uninformed on both what it is to be obese, and how ignorant they are of the facts that you ARE educated in order to receive these proceedures. No one yells at people with diabetes...heart disease...yet most of them are preventable as well with proper behavior modification in addition to the genetic components. I was going to comment back on the site but felt my blood pressure rising and decided it was better to let the ignorance die than to fuel the fire.

    ReplyDelete
  7. There are so many reasons to chose Lap-band over RNY. For me, I wanted a procedure that was adjustable. I know someone who had RNY 10 years ago and she's re-gained at least 80 lbs. Her only option is a second RNY which would likely affect her quality of life pretty dramatically. I can have a fill whenever I need one, but if Lap-band didn't work for me, it can be removed and I could have the sleeve or RNY. I don't know any statistics, but the fact that Lap-band is adjustable is such a huge benefit and should affect the long-term stats.

    ReplyDelete
  8. It pisses me off too when these articles are slanted and lack significant details.

    ReplyDelete
  9. articles never give an objective point of veiw. It was disappointing, the lack of details.

    ReplyDelete
  10. My thought for the day.. is it about losing weight fast or keeping it off.. you decide my sweeties..

    ReplyDelete
  11. Well said Barbara! Its articles like these that sway people's opinions and what many people rely on when they do their 'research.'

    ReplyDelete
  12. Regardless of the surgical procedure performed, the % of weight lost (and maintained) is all dependent upon a person's psychological status, determination and hard work. I worked as a Bariatric RN for several years and was always geared towards the bypass, which I did have in 2009. It was the right choice for ME. One thing I don't tolerate is the disrespect from others who have went another route. For the most part, we are in this for the SAME reason: To become healthier.

    I have friends and patients who have underwent both the bypass and the band. Both have ways of cheating and both have ways of being successful. It's the individual 99% of the time...not the tool.

    Have I regained my weight? I'm almost 2 years out and have maintained a 140 lbs loss even after becoming pregnant 10 months post-op. I have 20 pounds to go and I'm getting there. My eating habits and new found love of exercise are the two biggest things that will help me reach my goal.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I know my surgeon pushes the sleeve even for the larger patients. Personally, I wanted the band from day one and only debated the sleeve for a little minute. There are numerous articles that are biased on procedures so I think it boils down to the surgeon chosen and their education and care for what will be best for each individual patient. After all, that's who I would put my trust in.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I wasn't eligible for the bypass to begin with but even if I had been I wouldn't have risked the complications that go along with it.

    I have seen some awful things happen to bypass patients. I definitely preferred the least invasive procedure.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Agreed. Sounds like a lobbyist for gastric bypass wrote that article. =/

    ReplyDelete
  16. One thing I don't get is that lap band people always quote it being "reversible" - but it's NOT reversible if you want to keep the weight off, right, same as any other WLS?

    ReplyDelete